The Privilege of Discipling our Kids

[et_pb_section admin_label="section" fullwidth="off" specialty="off" background_image="http://www.wellspringcolorado.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/goldbackground.jpg" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_cta admin_label="Call To Action" title="The Privilege of Discipling our Kids" button_url="http://www.wellspringcolorado.com/connect" url_new_window="off" button_text="Back" use_background_color="off" background_color="#2EA3F2" background_layout="dark" text_orientation="left" body_line_height="2em" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_button="off" button_letter_spacing="0" button_use_icon="default" button_icon_placement="right" button_on_hover="on" button_letter_spacing_hover="0" header_font_size="42" body_font_size="14" button_text_size="20" button_border_width="2" button_border_radius="3" button_border_radius_hover="3"] [/et_pb_cta][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section][et_pb_section admin_label="section" transparent_background="off" background_color="#f4f4f4" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" text_font_size="14" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] By: Jon Weeks, Children and Family Intern, Wellspring Englewood

I have been both blessed and cursed by being thought of as “cool” by kids. I attribute it to being one at heart. It truly has been obvious what kind of work God is pulling me into. Time and time again I have gotten children in trouble for running around the sanctuary, by instigating the chase. It doesn’t matter who you are, if you are in your twenties, kids want to follow you.

Last month, I had the chance to teach the 4th and 5th grade class at Wellspring. As we moved from the comfy couches to the unforgiving chairs around a blank white table, everyone knew that the bible study was about to begin. This is not a hated time but if you have ever taught kids I don’t even need to describe what was going to happen next… energy and whining. These kids were only behaving this way because they thought what was in the headlights was predictable, boring. I told them that today they had a choice. I reassured them that this was not a trick and there was no guilt or punishment either way. On one hand, they could go to the other side of the room to have a snack and play whatever they wanted as long as it was quiet, on the other they could sit here and learn something they never heard before. I was not surprised that within a couple of minutes everyone had chosen to listen in.

I attribute this to the fact that our students are not uninterested by the gospel, but unchallenged by it. Right now we are in a particularly depressing time in the Catechesis curriculum trying to grasp the weight of our sinful rebellion that caused all pain, sorrow, and chaos. Our leaders have been doing a great job allowing the gospel message to take root by leading our kids out into the desert. It takes confidence to not finish each week with a simple wrap up answer that sits well, but to end with questioning. If we are unable to keep God’s law then why did he even give it to us? Did God make us in such a way that we could never please him? Our leaders know that in order to know how great God is, we also need to know how far we’ve fallen. This confidence is not only required of our leaders in the gospel, but also our students confidence in their leaders.

Nothing makes a kid believe that you care about them like participating in what they care about. Kids have had engrained into their DNA that they are students. The primary interaction they receive from adults outside of their parents is the teacher/student relationship. Our leaders are teachers in every sense of the word, but more than that they are people who come alongside of kids to enjoy what they enjoy. This is the hope of our 4th and 5th grade events, which have largely attracted the entire family. In these events students, teachers, and parents break the mold by becoming teammates. While playing capture the flag or kickball our kids begin to understand that their teacher values them. This builds the kind of relationship necessary to both lead and follow well in the classroom. Our students are challenged out of boredom because our leaders are willing to dive for a homerun. This weird reality is what I most wanted to share this month. I hope that it will spark a fire in those thinking about what it means to lead and encourage those who are to continue on.

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